The Western Shoshone Mother’s Day Walk-Run: May 7-13th

Please join the walk/run:

From the Facebook Group:

The Shoshone walk/run is a cultural event that takes place around the Nevada National Security Site , which use to be named the Nevada Test Site and also where the Nellis Air Force Base sits as well, but the land it sits on is the land of the Western Shoshone Nation. The Main purpose of the walk/run is to plant willows with our thoughts and prayers that goes in the hole thats made by the people with a pinch of tobacco offering, willows are spread out 3 or 4 miles apart while thats being done runners and walkers get spread out 2 miles apart and start of their walking or running after that 2 miles thats been covered then the supports with vehicles pick them up and go meet up with the people who are doing their prayer with the willow.

Before we all start off the walk/run we get together and set up camp at Warm Springs, NV which is north of Tonopah NV. When we gather as people we make prayer ties which is tobacco in little squares of red cloth with little string for the main staff pole that we carry across the land while we do our walk and run. We also use sagebrush that goes with each runner and walker, the reason why use sagebrush is to keep our strength up when were feeling weak or feeling hot its something thats used for medicine.

As for the camp set up every morning before the sun comes up theres a sunrise ceremony that takes place, in the middle of the ceremony one person covers about 2 or 3 miles with the staff pole after that he or she comes back and we all eat breakfast, when everyone is done eating we start to tear down camp which is the teepee, kitchen tent, and whatever else like tents, bags, chairs, tables, bins with food supplies, and anything else that needs to be put away. After all that has been done we circle up and get information from the main person who leads the walk/run which we’ll talk about how the day is going to be or how the day will turn out then we start dropping of the walkers and runners (Depends on how many walkers and runners there will be) and do the same thing till we get to the Nevada National Security Site.

For the safety of the people is to look out for one another make sure the people drink only Water and/or Gatorade it will be hot to warm weather and another thing is to make sure the vehicles with the signs that say SLOW DOWN RUNNERS AND WALKERS, are readable so local traffic could get ahead’s up on whose on the road during the walk/run

There will be more information for the Western Shoshone Walk/Run in this group such as the actually event that will take place I hope you can join us when that time comes. One more thing not just Shoshones can be there, EVERYONE can participate in the running and walking lets put our thoughts and prayers together as people.

Advertisements

Good Friday In A Nuclear World: 10 arrested at the Nevada National Security Site

Press Release
Nevada Desert Experience
Friday, April 6, 2012
Contact: John Amidon or Jim Haber, 702-646-4814 (office),
518-312-6442 (mobile John) 415-828-2506 (mobile Jim)

Good Friday In A Nuclear World:
10 arrested at the Nevada National Security Site

Nevada Desert Experience (NDE) concluded its 26th annual Sacred Peace Walk this morning at 11:00am. Thirty people participated in this year’s walk from Las Vegas to the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Ten were arrested in an often-repeated act of civil resistance standing for global nuclear abolition and Western Shoshone sovereignty in this region. The peaceful and prayerful demonstration included dozens of participants, with the final element of ten who crossed the line and were arrested by the Nye County Sheriffs and Wackenhut Security forces guarding the infamous nuclear testing grounds.

NDE continues its mission of supporting “personal renewal through desert spirituality, reconnecting with each other and the earth to end subcritical tests and other war-making preparations at the Nevada National Security Site and preventing the return of full-scale nuclear testing.” The NNSS continues its mission of promoting global domination through nuclear weapons prowess, as supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. Today’s activities began with a Western Shoshone sunrise prayer service led by Shoshone Chief Johnnie Bobb. The weekend will continue the formation of a reunion of former peace- campers from the 1980s gathering at the Peace Camp across US Highway 95 from the NNSS Mercury Exit. Earlier this week, the Sacred Peace Walkers held vigil at Creech Air Force Base as well, prior to the vigil for peace at the NNSS.

The ten NDE participants arrested today are Miki Tracy of WI, Rev. Felicia Parazaider of CA, Fr. Louie Vitale of CA, Laura-Marie Taylor of CA, John Amidon of Albany, NY, Theo Kayser of Los Angeles, CA, Erik Johnson of TN, Dennis Duvall of Prescott, AZ, and local Las Vegans Charlie Smith and Robert Majors. Two days prior to this prayer-action which ended in arrests at the NNSS, four of the above-named Sacred Peace Walkers were arrested at Creech Air Force Base while standing for international human rights (see the NDE news release) after serving an indictment to Col. James Hecker for violations of human rights.

October 9th Prayer Action: CatholicWorker arrests: 59 at the Nuclear Test Site (NNSS) and 18 at Creech Air Force Base

(photos: Mary Lou)

From: the CatholicWorker:
October 9th CW arrests: 59 @ the Nuclear Test Site (NNSS) & 18 @ Creech Air Force Base

NEVADA NATIONAL SECURITY SITE PRAYER-ACTION
The NNSS (formerly the NTS & NPG) has been unlawfully occupying Shoshone land for over 60 years, conducting nuclear bomb tests and other international criminal violence. It’s a place needing much prayer and radioactive remediation. The people working there need our prayers too. This week is also Keep Space for Peace Week, so today’s actions at the NNSS and Creech are supporting a peace-zone around the planet, including in the outer space currently occupied by US weapons satellites.

Therefore, Catholic Workers have come here for decades on special dates, so that the violence may stop, and national resources may be used for the common good, especially for poverty relief for those among the 99% of the people affected by the 1% who are making bad decisions.

CREECH AFB PRAYER-ACTION

Creech Air Force Base is the headquarters of the USAF’s 432nd Air Wing of Predator and Reaper drones which operates armed remotely piloted aircraft in various foreign countries. The NNSS continues to support the country’s nuclear weapons programs, has a mandate to restart full-scale nuclear bomb tests within two years if so ordered by the President, and receives and stores radioactive waste on land that legally belongs to the Western Shoshone Nation.

Therefore, Catholic Workers have decided to help halt these offenses, so that the violence may stop, and national resources may be used for the common good, especially for poverty relief for those among the 99% of the people affected by the 1% who are making bad decisions. This week is also Keep Space for Peace Week, so today’s actions at the NNSS and Creech are supporting a peace-zone around the planet, including in the outer space currently occupied by US weapons satellites.

\

List of arrestees at Creech still awaiting charges:

Matt Campbell (24) from Arizona
Huntley Hoffman (25) from Arizona
Nancy Mancias (41) from Arizona
Betsy Lamb (72) from Arizona
Fr. Jerry Zawada, (74) ofm from Arizona
John Heid (56) from Arizona
Toby Blome (56) from California
Mike Wisniewski (62) from California
Fr. Louis Vitale, ofm (79) from California
Mary Moody (47) from Iowa
Brian Terrell (56) from Iowa
Rosalie Riegle (74) from Michigan
Rebecca Lambert (28) Minnesota
Theo Kayser (21) from Missouri
Robert Majors (24) from Las Vegas, Nevada
Jim Haber (49) from Las Vegas, Nevada
Rachel Winch (27) from Wisconsin
Christine Nelson (64) from (North America)

Eight activists arrested at the Nevada Test Site

From: KNTV
Updated: wnRenderDate(‘Saturday, January 29, 2011 9:14 PM EST’, ”, true); Jan 30, 2011

Las Vegas, NV—Marking the 60th year since the first atomic bomb was tested on land belonging to the Western Shoshone National Council, near Indian Springs, Nevada, eight activists stepped onto the land and were immediately arrested by Nye County police.

The Western Shoshone National Council had issued permits for the activists to enter their land. “You bless the land with each of your footsteps,” said Johnnie Bobb, a leader of the Western Shoshone Nation. Taken into custody immediately after stepping onto the land were: George Homanich, Judy Homanich, Mary Lou Anderson, Renee Espeland, Brian Terrell, Denis DuVall, Jim Haber and Jerry Zawada.

On January 27th, 2011, five of the eight were sentenced to time served after Judge Jansen found them guilty of trespass for an April 2009 entry into Creech Air Force base. Judy Homanich, Renee Espeland, Brian Terrell, Denis DuVall and Jerry Zawada were among the “Creech 14.”

Jim Haber, coordinator of the Nevada Desert Experience, noted that the Nye County Sherriff’s office accepted as valid forms of identification the permits issued to the activists by the Western Shoshone National Council.

60 Years of Disaster

by Jim Haber, Coordinator of Nevada Desert Experience

January 27 marks 60 years since the first atomic bomb test in Nevada. Codenamed “Able” it was tiny for a nuclear weapon: the equivalent of 1,000 tons of TNT, about 1/15 the size of the bomb that killed upwards of 130,000 people in Hiroshima. Anniversaries are times to reflect, so what is the legacy of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), now called the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)? What is the current state of the NNSS and what is going on there? Are the nation and world safer for all the Cold War and post-Cold War efforts? As the NNSS re-purposes itself to focus more on detecting and containing national security threats, it still stands as a world-wide symbol of the making of weapons of mass destruction. The name change is intended to reassert its relevance in the absence of exploding nuclear devices, but the inherent problem of the NTS remains. The NNSS is always able to resume testing nuclear weapons within two years should the president order it.

Testing of nuclear weapons didn’t only happen at the Nevada Test Site. Historians even argue that using the bombs on Japan rather than demonstrating them on an unpopulated location constitute human experimentation. Treating victims as research subjects rather than patients was widely reported in Japan, as well as from victims of atmospheric testing in the 1950s. Targeting civilians was and remains a crime against humanity, as does threatening nuclear attack on non-nuclear states, no matter how repressive their leaders.

We, as a people, caused much worldwide grief for our part in the Cold War, which used small countries as battlegrounds with no concern for local populations or environments. Official tours of the NNSS and the displays at the Atomic Testing Museum in Las Vegas exhibit great pride in the NTS’ Cold War role. There is little mention in their history about efforts to stop testing and other parts of the nuclear weapons complex. Efforts to shut down the Soviet nuclear test site in Kazakhstan or French test sites in Africa and the South Pacific garner barely a word. Only a limited view is presented.

At the NNSS which is run by the Department of Energy (blurring the lines between civilian and military in this country), military nuclear waste is buried even as remediation efforts elsewhere are undertaken. The detection and first responder trainings are only defensive in nature if we concurrently support the leadership of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in its mission to monitor nuclear programs around the world. Unilateral or bilateral agreements that ignore the mandate of the IAEA actually encourage other states to seek nuclear weapons to be seen as worthy players on the international stage.

The United States military budget is on par with military spending of all other countries combined. When the US attacks countries that don’t have nuclear weapons, it makes the possession of nuclear weapons seem like a necessary deterrent. But if more countries have deterrent forces, then we’ve lost the disarmament fight.

Taking the land of the Western Shoshone and other native peoples to use it for nuclear testing is not just. Forcing the people of Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands to live on tiny Ebeye Island, creating one of the most densely populated places on Earth is not just. Stealing and contaminating native hunting and fishing grounds is not just.

Thank God so few countries have tested or possess nuclear weapons. The global consensus is clearly to eliminate all nuclear weapons. “Stockpile Stewardship” tests at the NNSS, along with missile tests in the Pacific are undermining the credibility of the U.S.’s agreement to seriously reduce nuclear stockpiles. Sharing nuclear technology with violators and abstainers of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty while threatening countries not in egregious, well-documented breaches of the NPT is not just and promotes horizontal proliferation. Hence, continued testing whether they’re full-scale tests or not, signals to the world that the US will keep its finger on the button and will brook no new players in the nuclear game.

When we devise ways for nuclear weapons to be more precise and kill fewer civilians, to be more militarily useful, we undermine the international consensus against all weapons of mass destruction. And how many design upgrades and revisions can be implemented and still not require a real test? At some point, unless we in the United States get serious about pressuring our government to cut its nuclear weapons arsenal, the Nevada Desert will again quake with detonations…and be filled with peacemakers crashing the gates like in the 1980s to shut it down once and for all. This anniversary should serve as a time to work for peace and disarmament.

# # #

Jim Haber is the Coordinator of Nevada Desert Experience (NDE) which organizes interfaith resistance to nuclear weapons and war. Jim is on the War Resisters League National Committee, and he edited the 2008 WRL Peace Calendar. Jim is also very active with Jewish Voice for Peace, the G.I. Rights Hotline and the Catholic Worker movement. He can be reached at: jim[at]nevadadesertexperience.org.